Intern Blog: What it Means to be A Good Monster

People in society view all things digital as menaces; monsters if you will. I know this first hand—my grandmother was a first generation Croatian who grew up on a farm with no electricity, let alone a Facebook page. She saw the internet and all the changes coming from it as threatening to society. In her eyes, the more you put yourself out there the more unprotected you could be, and Olga wasn’t the only one that felt this way. Although it is clear that as the years go by there is less of a backlash towards the power of the internet, there is a great deal of protest against “the man” or the people filling our lives and minds with products, services, ads, videos, and other ideas we may not even realize we are being exposed to. In ad classes, we are being taught to bombard consumers with messages—constantly posting on social media, placing ads in unavoidable places, creating stories that draw people into believing they need the brand. These tactics are used to create the idea that a product or service is more than a business, that the brand is trustworthy, familiar, and stands for something bigger than itself. This can be seen as tricky, stealthy, unjust.

Although advertisers and companies are not in the business to be corrupt, the fact that this idea is floating around in society is very much real. The concept of a Good Monster represents the positive side of these technologies and how they can expand our world in a meaningful way. Technology gives us the opportunity to be monsters but it can also bring about a lot of good, necessary change. Promoting a worthy cause or better exposing a group of people to a product that could make their lives easier is important. Even just adding to the space that acts as a place for acceptance and connectedness to anyone and everyone, is good. As a soon-to-be SU graduate with a long advertising future ahead of me, I’m excited to learn from The Good Monster just how much value can come from the business.

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn