The New Primetime is 24/7

Remember nighttime TV in the 90’s? You know, Primetime.

Ellen and Drew Carey on Wednesday, Friends and Seinfeld on Thursday, and who could forget X-files on Sunday.

Many over the age of 30 remember sitting down at 8 pm every night, next to their family, watching a string of 2-4 prime time shows.

It was Primetime Baby. The television time slot that every network, producer, and advertiser loved because all eyes were glued to TV screens across America. It got the best TV shows. It had the best, most expensive commercials. It was like the golden era of television.

Primetime might have been coined during the television era, but the golden era of radio had the same consumer pull in its heyday.

primetime radio - making your brand stand out

Image Source: WMKY

During and after the Great Depression, Mom and dad would come home from work (or looking for work) and flick on the radio dial to listen to the 1 or 2 radio stations to get their news and maybe a little comedy hour.

Up until now, Primetime has been a fixture in the structure of our daily lives for almost a century, but that has all changed now.

How it all changed

Primetime is now a highly individualized time frame, segmented and spread throughout the day. None of us have the same “Primetime”, we are certainly not all watching the same shows and there are too many networks to even count anymore.

Besides the increased availability of on-demand content, there are a few driving factors that have helped to break up Primetime for consumers across the U.S. and beyond.

Changing work/life balance

As a society, we are working differently than we did two decades ago. More and more people are working remotely, which means they are often not on a strict 9-5 work schedule. They might wake up at 9 am and watch their favorite show on Netflix for an hour with coffee while catching up on Instagram and their favorite news blogs. Then they work from 10-3 before going to the gym and listening to some great podcasts. When they get back from the gym at 5, they eat “dinner”. After dinner, they squeeze in another 2-3 hours of work until 9. At 9 they jump on Twitch and play Fortnite with all their friends until about midnight.

Obviously, this sounds like it might be someone younger, but these days, you never know.

Side-Hustlers

The internet has given millions of people the opportunity to work on their passions outside of their “day job”. This means that a lot of people, millennials especially, are getting out of their “9-5” and working on their “7-11”. This group of people isn’t even watching TV in its traditional sense. They might catch a Hulu show once in a while but they are probably consuming content from blogs, social media, and podcasts in passing, or interspersed between moments while they are working.

making your brand stand out

No matter what your day looks like, it probably doesn’t have a “Primetime” that looks like your parents’ did.

With the democratization of information and entertainment across hundreds of platforms, your “Primetime” is just that–yours.

So Primetime as we knew it is dead. The control has shifted from the networks control, to the consumers, and things have gotten really interesting…

What does these mean for advertisers?

Well, it means their job is getting harder by the minute.

A century ago Advertising was easy—just put an ad in the newspaper and put up a billboard. 70 years ago they could throw in a live radio read. 50 years ago they could knock peoples socks off with a TV commercial, and people WANTED to watch it! 20 years ago banner ads across the new “internet” gave them yet another possible point of impact. Enter social media a decade ago and all hell broke loose…

Now in order to survive a brand has to do 1-of-2 things:

  1. offer something truly and utterly unique so that people have to find them
  2. be everywhere your customer is all at the same time

And both are extremely hard, so good luck 🤦🏻‍♂️

P.S. Read this to learn how to be everywhere at once.

The Attention Podcast with Brad VanAuken

“A strong brand decreases price sensitivity and increases customer loyalty.” –
@BradVanAuken

 

brad vanauken


[powerpress]

Brad VanAuken is president and founder of BrandForward, Inc., a brand strategy consultancy with clients throughout the world. Previously, Brad was the vice president of marketing for Element K (now Skillsoft), a leading e-learning company and director of brand management and marketing for Hallmark Cards, Inc. During his tenure as Hallmark’s chief brand advocate, Hallmark rose to 4th in the EquiTrend national quality brand ranking and Hallmark received the Brand Management of the Year award.

Recognized as one of the world’s leading experts on brand management and marketing,Brad is a much sought after speaker and writer. He has been interviewed by ADWEEK, CNN, Entrepreneur magazine, Fox News, Investor’s Business Daily and The Bloomberg Money Show. He is an adjunct professor of marketing at RIT’s Saunders College of Business and has been a guest lecturer at many universities including Stanford University, Northwestern University, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, University of Rochester, University of Kansas and University of Missouri at Kansas City.


Questions:

Q: What is brand strategy and how can it affect a company’s bottom line?

Q: Can you give an example of a sound brand strategy out there that most people would recognize?

Q: Describe in the biggest misconception or mistake that businesses are making these days when it comes to building their brand.

Q: When building a brand strategy, where does one start?

Q: We know research is extremely important to a successful marketing campaign, but how in depth does a business really need to go? Can you give any examples of research you would do for a company with limited resources vs. a big brand with unlimited resources?

Q: Why did you write a book? What has it done for your own brand?

Monster Round:

1: What new brand in the past year is absolutely crushing it out there today? Why?

2: What is the most effective strategy/tactic of building brand awareness you have ever seen?

3: What’s your favorite social media network and why?

4: If you were to start a business today, what business would you start?

5: Who do you most admire and why?

Resources:

Blog: BrandingStrategySource.Blogspot.com
Company website: www.brandforward.com
Twitter account: https://twitter.com/bradvanauken
Google+: https://plus.google.com/+BradVanAuken/posts
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/bradvanauken
Amazon.com author profile: http://www.amazon.com/BradVanAuken/e/B001KHUQAG